Running Tips for Beginners + a FREE Running Guide {Part 2}

Running Tips for Beginners + a FREE Running Guide {Part 2}

Running tips for beginners part 2 is all about visualization and ways to help you become a better runner {or you know, just get into running at all}.

Last week I shared my top six tips and tricks for people who are trying to get into running, or even those who maybe haven’t run for quite some time and need that extra little push to get going again.

woman stretching, about to go for a run

But there was one thing that I think is huge when it comes to running. A tip that I didn’t actually think about until I was out on a run myself.

Visualization.

I realized I talked about having a good mindset and setting intentions for your runs, but I completely missed talking about how to make your runs even better with visualization.

Running Tips for Beginners: Visualization

As a beginner runner, you want to imagine yourself going on that run. How do you feel while you’re running?

Close your eye {you know, before you start running} and picture yourself running a specific course. Picture how you’re going to breathe.  Imagine that you’re having the best run you’ve ever had.

What are you wearing? What music are you listening to?

Replicating all of these, visually, will help improve your running because you’ll feel like you’ve already done it before!

Running Tips for Beginners: Breathing

Another important piece to think about when it comes to running is your breathing. Taking deeper breaths while running is going to be key because you’ll be flooding your muscles with oxygen to keep going.

Picture yourself taking in deep breaths while running. Expanding your stomach, filling up with a lot of air and exhaling in a controlled manner.

running tips for beginners: breathing

Your body will feel more relaxed and able to sustain a longer run because your breathing isn’t erratic. Meaning that those quick, short breaths are only making you feel more out of breath and unable to continue your run.

Running Tips for Beginners: How to get rid of a side ache

This one is a big one too. I remember when I was in high school, and hated running, I would always {always} get a side ache.

We’d run the track outside of school for the mile run, and I would always be one of the last people to finish. I hated that! And typically it was because I would get a side ache {or stitch in my side} that would keep me from running.

There was one day a few years ago that my dad and I were out for a run. I told him I had a really bad side ache and I wasn’t sure I could keep up. He told me to visualize {see how important that is??} a small blender blade inside my stomach, swirling up my side and breaking up that clump that was a side ache. Then he told me to visualize those side ache clumps falling down and into my legs as energy.

Turns out this really worked! Because only a couple minutes after I visualized that, my side ache was gone and I was running just fine.

Running Tips for Beginners: Putting it all together

Visualization is going to be the key to a great run. It’s similar to when a great golfer visualizes themselves hitting the ball, what their swing feels like, what it feels like to walk the course. And in those moments, they tend to end up having their best golf game yet!

Practice visualizing yourself running, whether it’s before bed or right before you go for a run. I bet you’ll have one of your best runs yet!

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Oh, and don’t forget about your FREE running printable! If you didn’t pick it up last week, here it is again {just click on the picture to download}:

Beginner's running plan and guide to take you from 0 miles to 1 in just two weeks. If you've never run before or want to get into running, follow this free running guide. #howtorun #running #runningguide #beginnersguide

 

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